Tag Archives: book

#60Books Review 15/2016: Hard Red Spring by Kelly Kerney

Read as part of my 60 Books Challenge: A book published in 2016

Kelly Kerney’s Hard Red Spring brings one hundred years of Guatemalan history to life.

Told through the eyes of four American women who witness four different periods of the twentieth century in Guatemala, this novel beautifully combines historical facts with memorable fiction.

Hard Red Spring also takes a look at the cultural divide, not only between the Guatemalans and the four American women, but also the different cultural groups in Guatemala, notably the Mayans.

The 1902 disappearance of a young girl is the red thread linking the four women, but the real protagonist of this novel is the country it is set in. Multi-dimensional and dynamic, the story remains as intriguing as it is heart-breaking to the very last page.

My Rating: ♥♥♥♥

Title: Hard Red Spring
Author: Kelly Kerney
Publisher: Viking
Release Date: March 29, 2016
Pages: 448
ISBN: 978-0525429012

 

Hard Red Spring by Kelly Kerney was provided to me as an
Advance Review Copy in eBook format by
Penguin Random House’s FirstToRead

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#60Books Review 3/2016: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

Read as part of my 60 Books Challenge: A mystery.

And Then There Were None is arguably the very best story the Grande Dame of Mystery Fiction, Agatha Christie, has ever written.

Originally published under the title Ten Little Niggers (or Ten Little Indians – back then these terms were not yet considered offensive), the story is about ten seemingly unrelated people who are lured to a remote island under false pretenses. It soon becomes apparent that there has to be a murderer among the group as one after the other is killed.

This story is THE whodunnit classic. Full of plot twists and red herrings, And Then There Were None stays gripping to the very last page, just as the protagonists stay classy and reserved in true British fashion. Even as the number of suspects decreases, readers are left wondering who the killer is and what their motives are.

Agatha Christie truly is a legend.

Rating: ♥♥♥♥♥

Friday 56: Vol. 15

The Friday 56 is a blog hop by Freda’s Voice and the rules are simple:

  • Turn to the nearest book.
  • Open it on page 56.
  • Post a sentence or two.
  • Join the linky.
  • Go crazy on the linky.

“He paused in the tumult, standing, looking beyond them and down the unfriendly side of the mountain to the great patch where they had found dead wood. Then he laughed so strangely that tey were hushed, looking at the flash of his spectacles in astonishment. They followed his gaze to find the sour joke. ‘You ot your small fire alright.'”                                                                                  –  Lord of the Flies by William Golding

 

While you’re here, could you do me a favour? Please pop over to Inkitt and give my story a LIKE in the Fandom Writing Contest. Thank you!

Friday 56: Vol. 13

The Friday 56 is a blog hop by Freda’s Voice and the rules are simple:

  • Turn to the nearest book.
  • Open it on page 56.
  • Post a sentence or two.
  • Join the linky.
  • Go crazy on the linky.

“Little by little, people trickled out of the fields and drifted down the road. The red-toothed old ldy was back, as was the boy on the buffalo and all the other kids. We greeted each other like long-lost relatives – waving turned to handshakes turned to hugs all around.”

Tales from Nowhere edited by Don George

Friday 56: Vol. 11

The Friday 56 is a blog hop by Freda’s Voice and the rules are simple:

  • Turn to the nearest book.
  • Open it on page 56.
  • Post a sentence or two.
  • Join the linky.
  • Go crazy on the linky.

“Each year, she was voted Prettiest Girl in their form, and she would wryly say, ‘It’s just because I’m a half-caste. How can I be finer than Zainab?'”

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Friday 56: Vol. 3

The Friday 56 is a blog hop by Freda’s Voice and the rules are simple:

  • Turn to the nearest book.
  • Open it on page 56.
  • Post a sentence or two.
  • Join the linky.
  • Go crazy on the linky.

“These nicknames fascinated Julia; their inexplicable specifity was confounding. During her formative years in Milwaukee, nicknames had always been obvious and derivative: A left-handed person might be called “Lefty,” or a big-boned girl would be labeled “Moose.” Milwaukee slang was also less adhesive; if you put peroxide in your hair, you might get called “Blondie” for one summer (or maybe even for half a school year), but that kind of moniker was never permanent. This was not the case in Owl.”

Downtown Owl by Chuck Klosterman